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We are Green & Eco-Friendly! show me.


he local shrimp fishermen in the Sea of Cortez region of Mexico have long known and relied on the hardwood properties of mesquite in building seaworthy vessels. Mesquite is a gnarled, twisted, hardy desert survivor that can grow as large as mature oak trees, if sufficient water is present. Challenged to extract straight boards, a miller of mesquite typically discards the outer wood, which comprises up to fifty percent of the tree. The exciting range of color, shapes, and grain dramatically present in the outer wood is the basis for our craft items. The straight, much sought after boards command premium dollars from the custom homebuilders and cabinetmakers who appreciate its stability and incredible character.


eak, mahogany, and mesquite are equally ranked as the most stable hardwoods in the world. The American Hardwood Association classifies mesquite as replenishable, rare, and exotic. It is harder than oak or maple. Additionally, the wood does not degrade in weather. Mesquite cutting boards used in commercial kitchens and washed repeatedly in dishwashers retain their integrity for a lifetime with no checking, splitting, or warping. From sapwood to heartwood, no other hardwood offers mesquite's wide range of color and grain. It varies in tone from lemon, honey, and caramel, to burgundy, and from straight grain to highly figured including burled, quilted, birds eye, and fiddle back.


here is little documented about mesquite, and yet it remains a significant element in the natural and cultural landscape of the southwest. Indigenous American people and later European arrivals have developed patterns and adapted traditions specific to the unique properties of mesquite. The nutritious bean has nourished both man and livestock. Early settlers relied on the native tree as quite often the only shelter or shade in an otherwise sun bleached countryside. The use of the wood has ranged from venerable to humble, from Colonial Mexico carved church doors to range posts for barbed wire fences. Mesquite scrub and trees have proliferated, replacing overgrazed grasslands throughout the southwest. To the cattleman, such growth can be a pariah. To the craftsman, the hardwood is a treasure.


orking mesquite from tree to finished product has engendered a rare knowledge of the wood - a factor that distinguishes our craftsmanship. We feel that mesquite is nature's "quintessential wood."



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